Filipinos Captured a Giant Crocodile

A giant male crocodile measured 21-foot (7-meter) and weighed 2,370 lbs (1,075-kg) and estimated at least 50 years old was captured. The one-ton male saltwater beast was trapped in a creek in Bunawan, in the Philippines, last Saturday night. It is feared to have attacked several villagers was caught after a three-week hunt.

Mayor Cox Elorde of Bunawan township, Agusan del Sur Province, pretends to measure a huge crocodile which was captured by residents and crocodile farm staff along a creek in Bunawan late Saturday in southern Philippines.

Mayor Cox Elorde of Bunawan township, Agusan del Sur Province, pretends to measure a huge crocodile which was captured by residents and crocodile farm staff along a creek in Bunawan last Saturday in southern Philippines.

It is one of the largest crocodile ever to be captured alive in the Philippines. Dozens of locals and staff from a crocodile farm set up traps to catch the monster after reports of a number of savage crocodile attacks.

The villagers prepare for initial sightings, hunters set four traps, which the crocodile destroyed. They then used sturdier traps using steel cables, one of which finally caught it.

About 100 people had to pull the crocodile to a clearing where a crane lifted it into a truck. The crocodile was placed in a fenced cage in an area where the town plans to build an ecotourism park for species found in a vast marshland in Agusan, an impoverished region about 500 miles from Manila.

According to the reports, the reptile is suspected of killing a fisherman who went missing in July. The crocodile may now be put into a planned ecotourism park in the southern town. Mayor Cox Elorde says that this would turn it “from a threat into an asset.” The giant crocodile which was pulled by 100 people is destined to become the star of a planned ecotourism park for the town.

Despite the catch, villagers remain wary because several crocodiles still roam the outskirts of the farming town of about 37,000 people. The people in that place have been told to avoid venturing into marshy areas alone at night.

But then, the Philippine laws strictly prohibit civilians from killing endangered crocodiles, with violators facing up to 12 years in prison and a fine of 1 million pesos.

The world’s most endangered freshwater variety, crocodylus mindorensis, is found only in the Philippines, where only about 250 are known to be in the wild. About 1,000 of the larger saltwater type, or crocodylus porosus, like the one captured in Bunawan, are scattered mostly in the country’s southern swamplands. Environment Secretary Ramon Paje said that the enormous crocodile was captured because it was a threat to the community but added that the reptiles are a reminder that the country’s remaining rich habitats need to be constantly protected. Crocodiles have been hunted in the country by poachers hoping to cash in on the high demand in wealthy Asian countries for their skin, which is coveted for vanity products ranging from bags to cellphone cases and the like.

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